War Memorials

VILLAGE WAR MEMORIALS

There are six war memorials within the south Lincolnshire village of
Ropsley. Four of these are sited within the village church of St. Peters
and the other two are sited on the village green.

 VILLAGE GREEN OBELISK MEMORIAL

 

Obelisk Memorial

Photo byAlwyn Sentence

Obelisk Memorial

The oldest memorial takes the form of a pink marble obelisk with the names of the fallen picked out in gold lettering. It stands on the
village green and was formally opened on March 30th. 1922 by the Hon
Claude Willoughby MP. It cost one hundred and seventy nine pounds
thirteen shillings and four old pennies and was paid for by local
people. Originally this memorial carried only the names of the fallen
from WW1 but following WW2 further names were added. Sadly in 1999 when the obelisk had stood unmolested since 1922 tragedy struck. It was smashed in a road traffic accident. However, in due course it was replaced in its original form and the opportunity at replacement was taken to add additional names only recently discovered.

The original 1922 memorial was surrounded by railings. These were
removed at the start of WW2 to provide war material. After the cessation
of hostilities the railings were refitted only to be removed again in
the 1970s. At 2012 the obelisk stands alone.

VILLAGE GREEN SMALL MEMORIAL

Second Ropsley Village Green Memorial

Photo byAlwyn Sentance

Second Ropsley Village Green Memorial

At the millennium research indicated that a further small group of
local men who had been lost in war had not been remembered on any local
memorial. In 2009 this was rectified. A second memorial was erected on
the village green. This memorial was financed by the Sentance family. It
is small and made of the same pink marble as its neighbour. Again the
lettering is picked out in gold.

The final four Ropsley village war memorials are sited within the
parish church of St. Peters. These are described below.

CHURCH ROLL OF HONOUR

Church Roll of Honour

Photo byAlwyn Sentance

Church Roll of Honour

The oldest church memorial is a roll of honour remembering those who died during WW1. It takes the form of a marble plaque surrounded by an
ornate decoration topped by a cross and was dedicated at a special
service on February 19th 1922. The names are supported by the following
moving words.

“THEY DIED THE NOBLEST DEATH A MAN CAN DIE FIGHTING FOR GOD AND RIGHT AND LIBERTY.”

CORPORAL WATMOUGH PLATE

Frances Watmough Memorial Plate

Photo byAlwyn Sentance

Frances Watmough Memorial Plate

Corporal Watmough was a local man who was killed at Arras in 1917. His widow, Elsie Watmough presented the church with two prayer stools in his memory. She also arranged for a commemorative plate to be fitted in the church. This brass plate is sited on a choir pew at the right side of the church.


PHILIP DALES STAINED GLASS WINDOW

Philip Dales Stained Glass Window

Photo byAlwyn Sentance

Philip Dales Stained Glass Window

The third church war memorial at Ropsley takes the form of a striking stained glass window which is sited in the south wall. It is dedicated to the memory of Sergeant William Philip Dales who was a fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force. ‘Phil’ was a Ropsley man who enlisted in the RAF at the start of WW2. He went on to fly in action many times surviving until 1941. Sadly, whilst flying a mission over Belgium on November 5th 1941 he was shot down and killed.
  
In 1949 his family gained permission from the Dioceses authorities to
erect a stained glass window in his memory. Later that year the window
was put in place. It was funded entirely from the Dales family resources. The scene is that of Sergeant Dales in flying uniform with angels above and gun dogs at his feet. The inscription reads, “Greater love have no man than this that he lay down his life for his friends.”

 SCROLL OF HONOUR

Scroll of Honour

Photo byAlwyn Sentance

Scroll of Honour

The final Ropsley parish church war memorial takes the form of a scroll
of honour. It is sited on the north wall and dates from 2009. The scroll
provides a list of names of village war dead not included on the original roll. The names listed on the scroll were discovered during millennium research on unrelated matters undertaken by the Sentance family. This memorial was funded by the Sentance family. Its inclusion within the church, together with the other memorials, now provides a complete list of village war dead held within this one holy place. The scroll takes the form of a framed photograph of the updated roll.